Type

Database

Creator

Date

Thumbnail

Search results

17 records were found.

“I’ve been fostering for 15 years. I’ve even won an award. Big Deal! All I see is things going downhill and getting worse. What good will come from this research? Will anything change?” [Foster Carer 2003] “I’ve participated in heaps of surveys but seen no improvements. What difference will this survey make?” [Foster Carer 2003] “It’s really disheartening to think that you do all this work and nothing may come of it” [PhD Researcher 2003] These opening comments have been made this year in respect of the collaborative research on Foster Care and Foster Carers being undertaken by the research partnership between the School of Social Work and Community Welfare at James Cook University and the Mackay/Whitsunday Region of the Queensland Department of Families. They reflect uncertainty shared by both researchers and research partici...
“I’ve been fostering for 15 years. I’ve even won an award. Big Deal! All I see is things going downhill and getting worse. What good will come from this research? Will anything change?” [Foster Carer 2003] “I’ve participated in heaps of surveys but seen no improvements. What difference will this survey make?” [Foster Carer 2003] “It’s really disheartening to think that you do all this work and nothing may come of it” [PhD Researcher 2003] These opening comments have been made this year in respect of the collaborative research on Foster Care and Foster Carers being undertaken by the research partnership between the School of Social Work and Community Welfare at James Cook University and the Mackay/Whitsunday Region of the Queensland Department of Families. They reflect uncertainty shared by both researchers and research ...
In this paper we describe and promote a model of groupwork with parents of children in care in operation in Townsville, a regional city in northern Australia, since 1989. We begin from the premise that parents have frequently been 'left out of the loop' as key players in child protection. This is despite the fact that it is parents' ability to afford protection that is at issue. The paper proceeds to discuss what is meant by empowerment in the context of a social work group work approach with parents. A model of group work is then presented. The paper concludes with discussion of the implications that this approach has for social work in child protection practice.
Foster carers offer an important form of support for vulnerable families who, either temporarily or in the longer term, are unable to provide day-to-day care for their children. Much has been written from a professional perspective about the qualities which foster carers should possess in order to provide good quality care for children and their families, but rarely have the views of foster carers themselves been canvassed as to “what makes a good foster carer”. This paper will fill a gap in our knowledge by presenting the views of 115 foster carers interviewed in the Mackay/Whitsunday region in 2002-3. Unlike other recent Australian studies with foster carers, this research included relative, Indigenous and male carers, as well as the more numerous female General carers. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive view of the shared and...
Research to date has found that natural parents may be an important source of identity and support for children in and young people leaving out-of-home care. There has, however, been limited research on natural parents themselves, both internationally and in Australia. This paper provides a justification for a research focus on parents, documents what is known from research to date, highlights current issues for parents and their children in out-of-home care, and concludes by identifying future research priorities in the area. The paper calls for recognition of the need to maintain positive links between natural family members in order to ensure best practice outcomes for children and young people in care.
Research to date has found that natural parents may be an important source of identity and support for children in and young people leaving out-of-home care. There has, however, been limited research on natural parents themselves, both internationally and in Australia. This paper provides a justification for a research focus on parents, documents what is known from research to date, highlights current issues for parents and their children in out-of-home care, and concludes by identifying future research priorities in the area. The paper calls for recognition of the need to maintain positive links between natural family members in order to ensure best practice outcomes for children and young people in care.
In this paper we describe and promote a model of groupwork with parents of children in care in operation in Townsville, a regional city in northern Australia, since 1989. We begin from the premise that parents have frequently been 'left out of the loop' as key players in child protection. This is despite the fact that it is parents' ability to afford protection that is at issue. The paper proceeds to discuss what is meant by empowerment in the context of a social work group work approach with parents. A model of group work is then presented. The paper concludes with discussion of the implications that this approach has for social work in child protection practice.
Foster carers offer an important form of support for vulnerable families who, either temporarily or in the longer term, are unable to provide day-to-day care for their children. Much has been written from a professional perspective about the qualities which foster carers should possess in order to provide good quality care for children and their families, but rarely have the views of foster carers themselves been canvassed as to “what makes a good foster carer”. This paper will fill a gap in our knowledge by presenting the views of 115 foster carers interviewed in the Mackay/Whitsunday region in 2002-3. Unlike other recent Australian studies with foster carers, this research included relative, Indigenous and male carers, as well as the more numerous female General carers. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive view of the shared an...
Across Australia there is a large number of people from diverse cultures who provide primary care for children and young people from within their own extended family. Such carers exist across the family spectrum and include grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings and others, for example great-grandparents. A relatively small proportion of these carers are registered officially as foster carers because the child and/or young person placed in their care is on a care and protection order. While legally their role is identical to that of other foster carers, who similarly provide care for a child or young person who is unable to live with their own parents, the experience and needs of statutory relative foster carers are also vastly different. This paper will focus on the distinctive aspects of statutory relative foster care and will assess ...
This paper will present findings from research with Indigenous Foster Carers who were part of the Mackay Whitsunday large study of Foster Care and Foster Carers (2000-2004). To understand the lives of Indigenous Foster Carers there needs to be a connection to the part that history has played in their own lives. Past policies, which involved the emotionally violent removal of Indigenous children (the Stolen Generations) from their families and communities, left many families disenfranchised or destroyed. This research has looked at the part this connection to the past has played and it has explored whether past experiences had any specific bearing on the decision to foster. A vital component of this study is a detailed analysis of Indigenous Foster Carers' own views. Topics analysed include Foster Carers' motivation, attitudes, hopes, f...
Want to know more?If you want to know more about this cutting edge product, or schedule a demonstration on your own organisation, please feel free to contact us or read the available documentation at http://www.keep.pt/produtos/retrievo/?lang=en