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Tafenoquine is an 8-aminoquiniline related to primaquine with preclinical activity against a range of malaria species. We treated two acute cases of vivax malaria with tafenoquine (800 mg over three days) atone, instead of conventional chloroquine (1500 mg over three days) and primaquine (420 mg over 14 days). In addition to the convenience of this regimen, the rapid parasite clearances observed, coupled with a good clinical response and lack of recrudescence or relapse, indicate that further investigation of tafenoquine in the treatment of vivax malaria is warranted. (C) 2004 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
The Australian Defence Force has a long history of exposure to malaria and frequently deploys into the immediate area of the Pacific Rim where drug resistance has been noted to be problematic. In the late 1990s failures of established malaria prophylaxis regimens were beginning to become more prevalent within the ADF and a search was commenced to identify alternative or promising emerging prophylaxis and treatment regimens. In this context the work presented within this thesis was undertaken with a new 8-aminoquinolone antimalarial, initially formulated by the United States Army's Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and identified as investigative compound WR 238605. The thesis investigates its utility as both prophylaxis and treatment for malaria infection. The compound was subsequently identified in a joint development arr...
The Australian Defence Force has a long history of exposure to malaria and frequently deploys into the immediate area of the Pacific Rim where drug resistance has been noted to be problematic. In the late 1990s failures of established malaria prophylaxis regimens were beginning to become more prevalent within the ADF and a search was commenced to identify alternative or promising emerging prophylaxis and treatment regimens. In this context the work presented within this thesis was undertaken with a new 8-aminoquinolone antimalarial, initially formulated by the United States Army's Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and identified as investigative compound WR 238605. The thesis investigates its utility as both prophylaxis and treatment for malaria infection. The compound was subsequently identified in a joint development arr...
Tafenoquine was used to treat Plasmodium vivax malaria cases who had previously failed treatment with chloroquine and primaquine. Chloroquine was followed by a loading dose of tafenoquine (200 mg base/day for 3 days) and 200 mg a week was given for 8 weeks. One of 27 treated patients relapsed after 6 months of observation. A standard course of chloroquine administered with 8 weeks of tafenoquine may be more effective than chloroquine with primaquine (22.5 mg/day for 14 days) in preventing additional P. vivax relapses. Larger studies are required to optimize the combination, but our findings suggest that an extended use of tafenoquine may be required to prevent relapses of primaquine-tolerant strains of P. vivax malaria.
Clinical and personnel management audit drawn by an authorised person from existing Defence Central Medical Records. The clinical audit reported on asthma events and the number of days missed due to illness. It was also used to assess impact on the training continuum, individual readiness and availability/suitability for deployment. The outcomes to be monitored included:  adverse outcomes from asthma- days lost from work, hospitalisation/emergency; department attendances, exacerbations requiring corticosteroids  attrition rates  exercise/fitness test results  operational deployability  costs incurred over one year for clinic visits and medication usage
An outbreak of malaria first developed within Second Battalion Royal Australian Regiment, a forward (Australian) Battalion of the International Force in East Timor in October 1999. Before the Battalion redeployed to Australia, 17 cases had occurred and in the 12 months following return to Australia another 89 cases have occurred, including 18 single recurrences and 2 second recurrences. The overall attack rate for this deployment of 4 months, mostly including the wet season of Timor, has been 13.5%. The attack rate for the Battalion (5/7 Royal Australian Regimen) subsequently occupying this ground (for approximately 4 months and including the 12 months following redeployment) was 5.2%. Investigation of the initial outbreak and comparisons with the subsequcnt Battalion suggest major risk factors for contracting malaria were side effects...
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