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Comment: 4 pages, 4 figures, updated version after review, accepted for PRL
Graphene - a monolayer of carbon atoms densely packed into a hexagonal lattice - has one of the strongest possible atomic bonds and can be viewed as a robust atomic-scale scaffold, to which other chemical species can be attached without destroying it. This notion of graphene as a giant flat molecule that can be altered chemically is supported by the observation of so-called graphene oxide, that is graphene densely covered with hydroxyl and other groups. Unfortunately, graphene oxide is strongly disordered, poorly conductive and difficult to reduce to the original state. Nevertheless, one can imagine atoms or molecules being attached to the atomic scaffold in a strictly periodic manner, which should result in a different electronic structure and, essentially, a different crystalline material. A hypothetical example for this is graphan...
Graphene is the two-dimensional building block for carbon allotropes of every other dimensionality. Since its experimental discovery, graphene continues to attract enormous interest, in particular as a new kind of matter, in which electron transport is governed by a Dirac-like wave equation, and as a model system for studying electronic and phonon properties of other, more complex, graphitic materials[1-4]. Here, we uncover the constitutive relation of graphene and probe new physics of its optical phonons, by studying its Raman spectrum as a function of uniaxial strain. We find that the doubly degenerate E2g optical mode splits in two components, one polarized along the strain and the other perpendicular to it. This leads to the splitting of the G peak into two bands, which we call G+ and G-, by analogy with the effect of curvature o...
We uncover the constitutive relation of graphene and probe the physics of its optical phonons by studying its Raman spectrum as a function of uniaxial strain. We find that the doubly degenerate E(2g) optical mode splits in two components: one polarized along the strain and the other perpendicular. This splits the G peak into two bands, which we call G(+) and G(-), by analogy with the effect of curvature on the nanotube G peak. Both peaks redshift with increasing strain and their splitting increases, in excellent agreement with first-principles calculations. Their relative intensities are found to depend on light polarization, which provides a useful tool to probe the graphene crystallographic orientation with respect to the strain. The 2D and 2D(') bands also redshift but do not split for small strains. We study the Gruneisen parameter...
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