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The BELLFLOWER CENTER FOR PREVENTION OF CHILD ABUSE, INC. opened in 1981 at 11234 Bellflower Rd. in UNIV. CIRCLE to support and educate parents in and about childrearing. The JUNIOR LEAGUE OF CLEVELAND, INC. and the NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, CLEVELAND SECTION, supported the center's founding. The Bellflower Center has sponsored group and individual programs such as Parents Anonymous (for parents who abuse or fear they will abuse their CHILDREN), Young Mothers' Parents Anonymous, Grown Up Abused Children (for adults abused as children), Nurturing (to strengthen family relationships), and RAISE (Resolve Abuse, Instill Self-Esteem, professionally guided treatment groups for male abusers and/or wife batterers). The center's 24-hour telephone hotline helps parents who feel out of control. Bellflower also educates the community about...
AMERITECH (AMERICAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES CORP.) is the Chicago-based holding company founded in 1983 to receive all shares of 5 telephone companies: Illinois Bell, Indiana Bell, Michigan Bell, Wisconsin Bell, and Ohio Bell from the divestiture of AT&T. The new company subsequently organized subsidiaries for mobile communications service, directory advertising and publishing, customer sales and service, development, and lease financing for products and services. The Cleveland-based subsidiary, the Ohio Bell Telephone Co., began in Sept. 1879 when Edward P. Wright, superintendent of the Western Union Telegraphy Co. established the city's first telephone exchange, located in the Board of Trade Bldg. on Water (W. 9th) St. Seventy-six people paid $72 per year to join. Wright soon sold the exchange for $16,300 and became vice president o...
ATKINS (NUSBAUM), LARRY (LAWRENCE) (3 Mar. 1903-24 July 1981), was a nationally known boxing matchmaker and fight promoter from the 1930s to the 1960s. Atkins was born in Cleveland to Michael and Fannie Pasternak Nusbaum. He attended East Tech and Glenville High School and was a bat boy for the CLEVELAND INDIANS as well as a boyhood friend of Blob Hope. He studied at Ohio Business College and John Marshall Law School. In the early 1920s, he worked for the CLEVELAND NEWS and PLAIN DEALER sports departments. Moving to Chicago, he helped Frank Churchill promote prizefights. During a 3-year period, which included the second Tunney fight in 1927, Atkins was Jack Dempsey's personal press agent. Returning to Cleveland in 1929, Atkins began promoting fights in the city. When CLEVELAND MUNICIPAL STADIUM opened, he became the public-relations di...
BENEDICT, DANIEL (20 Mar. 1776-16 Nov. 1840) was a pioneer settler and the first permanent resident of BEDFORD. At the time the Township was organized in 1823, it was Benedict who proposed the name Bedford in honor of his home town. Born in Bedford, Connecticut, Benedict first moved to Vermont before settling in the wooded wilderness of the Bedford area in 1821. Here he built a sawmill at TINKER'S CREEK, a tributary of the CUYAHOGA RIVER, providing power for early industries. Benedict was active in the Township's government during its early years. On April 7, 1823 he was elected to the first Board of Trustees for Bedford Township, serving until 1825. He was also appointed as judge. Daniel and Catharine Benedict had nine sons, Julius, Darius, Ralph, Sillock, Judson, James, Rodolphus, Phinamber and Allison. Benedict belonged to th...
BULKLEY, ROBERT JOHNS (8 Oct. 1880-21 July 1965), a prominent banker and businessman, was a Democratic U.S. Representative from 1910-14 and U.S. senator from 1930-39. Born in Cleveland, to Charles Henry and Roberta Johns Bulkley, he received an A.B. (1902) and M.A. (1906) from Harvard, and studied law for a year. Bulkley was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1907. Urged by Mayor TOM L. JOHNSON to run for Congress, Bulkley was elected in 1910. As a member of the Banking & Currency Committee, he helped frame the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, but lost his bid for reelection in 1915. During WORLD WAR I he served the legal departments of several federal boards. Returning to Cleveland, he headed the Bulkley Bldg. Co. and helped found the Morris Plan Bank of Ohio, serving as president and chairman of the board for over 30 years. He was a founder o...
WELFARE/RELIEF. The relief of destitution has been a responsibility of local government since Colonial times. Territorial laws to prevent extreme suffering and death (but not to relieve poverty) existed before Cleveland's founding and settlement. Relief was kept low and unattractive, lest workers be lured into dependency, requiring more taxes from other workers. The unattractiveness of relief was found in all 3 forms: indoor relief (admission to the poorhouse or infirmary), outdoor relief (aid to sustain independent living), or in-kind relief (material goods such as food, coal for heating, etc.). Provision was always well below levels of adequacy, and the recipient was usually made to feel demeaned by dependence. The universal poverty of relief recipients occurred even in Cleveland, the nation's most generous large city (measured by el...
ASTRUP CO., a distributor of fabrics to the awning, marine, casual furniture, and sports industries, was established in 1876 by Danish sailmaker Wm. J. O. Astrup, who had come to the U.S. and settled in Cleveland 10 years earlier. The company began as a manufacturer of sails for Great Lakes ships, but as sails became obsolete Astrup turned increasingly to the manufacture of other canvas products, especially the awnings which were growing in popularity with home and business owners. Describing himself as an awningmaker, by 1883 Astrup had moved his operations to 1114 Pearl Rd. (2937 W. 25th St.), which remained the company's location in 1995. In addition to manufacturing awnings, Astrup began to make and sell awning hardware; in the 1890s he added tents to his line of products. Incorporated in 1909 as the Astrup Co., the firm passed int...
VORCE, MYRON BOND (14 Aug. 1871-?), was President of the Vorce Engineering Company and was responsible for the design of much of the present park and boulevard system in Cleveland. Vorce was a native of the city of Cleveland and was educated in the CLEVELAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS. His father was Charles M. Vorce, and his mother was Evelyn Cornelia Marshall. After securing a position with a surveying company, Vorce began to study engineering and held various positions in that field. While employed by E.W. Bowdich of Boston, he was sent to Cleveland to develop Euclid Heights, Clifton Park and other local projects. He worked as an assistant engineer with the park board and in 1898 joined the city engineering department as assistant engineer in the work of intercepting sewers, and led reorganization efforts within the sewer maintenance depar...
The AMERICAN AND CANADIAN SPORT, TRAVEL, AND OUTDOOR SHOW, an annual event in Cleveland, was first held in 1927 at the PUBLIC AUDITORIUM and ran until 1930, when it was discontinued due to the Depression. Commonly referred to as the Sportman's Show, it resumed in 1937 and has taken place every year since then. The original event was the idea of Clevelanders Aaron W. Newman, who ran the show until his death in 1963, and Morris Ackerman, the outdoor writer for the CLEVELAND PRESS. The idea behind the first show in 1927 was to allow manufacturers of outdoor and sports equipment to display their products and to encourage the public's growing interest in the recreational value of the outdoors. The early shows featured exhibits and demonstrations relating to boating, hunting, fishing, and camping, as well as golf, baseball, and tennis gear;...
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