Database

Creator

Date

Thumbnail

Search results

17,579 records were found.

BALKAN IMMIGRANTS. Bulgarians, Albanians, and Montenegrins constitute the principal Balkan groups in Cleveland. The major period of Balkan immigration to the U.S. occurred from 1880-1924, prompted by economic stress and political changes in the Balkan countries. The economic condition of Balkan peasants had deteriorated because of industrialization, foreign competition, agricultural commercialization, and population growth. Political unrest and demands for independence following the retreat of the Ottoman Empire created uncertainty and instability. Natural disasters further prompted many Balkans to leave. Most immigrants were peasants, possessing few skills, no formal education, and meager financial resources, attracted by Cleveland's unskilled labor opportunities. In their urban ghettos, social networks provided newcomers with the su...
The ARPAD ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, a professional organization founded to recognize and support scientists, authors, and artists of Hungarian descent, was founded in 1965 by JOHN B. NADAS. Nadas, a native of Hungary, came to the U.S. in 1950 and settled in Lakewood shortly thereafter. He soon became a leader in Hungarian-American affairs. He headed the Arpad Academy of Arts and Sciences for over 25 years, until his death in August 1992 at the age of 89. The Arpad Academy of Arts and Sciences was one of a number of organizations founded in the post-World War II era by recent HUNGARIAN immigrants to preserve the traditions of their native land. Members of this Lakewood-founded and -based organization discuss world events and engage in cultural activities. There is an annual meeting with a symposium. The organization contributes to ...
MOVIE THEATERS. From nickelodeons to multiplexes, the evolution of motion picture houses in Cleveland is a reliable reflection of national trends. According to the dean of local movie critics, W. WARD MARSH, Cleveland got its first movie theater in 1903, when The Great Train Robbery began showing at the American Theater on Superior Ave. near E. 6th St. It was operated by Samuel Bullock, who endeavored to give his house respectability by paying women to enter the darkened auditorium. Bullock was soon part-owner of 5 movie theaters and a founder of what became the Cleveland Motion Picture Exhibitors Assn. By the time of World War I, the city was dotted with silent movie houses bearing such fanciful names as Wonderland, Fairyland, Moonlight, Lark, See It, and Enjoy U. There was a total of 32 movie listings in 1917, including 7 downtown, 1...
CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER OF CLEVELAND. See CLEVELAND CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART.
MACHINE TOOL INDUSTRY. FRANK A. SCOTT, a Clevelander at the forefront of the machine tool industry during the early 1900s, once remarked that no metal could be available for modern uses until a machine tool has been applied to shape it. For years, machine tools--power-operated, metal-working machines by which other machines are built--helped to shape the City of Cleveland, its workforce, and industrial expansion. Although a small industry by nature and overshadowed by the city's dominant IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY, machine tool manufacturers flourished in Cleveland from the 1880s through the 1940s, only in recent years faced with the onslaught of overseas competition, corporate mergers and buyouts, and the rapid decline during the 1980s of the national machine tool industry. During the 1700s a need for accurate cylinders for steam engine...
MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR. Many of the 10,000 people living in Cleveland in 1846, and citizens of northern Ohio generally, were not inclined to support the objectives of the U.S. in the War with Mexico or to volunteer for military service. Viewing the conflict as a pure and simple plot to extend slavery, they opposed both the war and its perceived objectives. It is not surprising, then, that the war's consequences were much more dramatic in the world of politics than in military legend or economic effects. The war began with a skirmish between U.S. and Mexican army units in the disputed region between the Nueces and the Rio Grande rivers in Texas in May 1846. Congress approved the resolution for war on 13 May. Recruitment of volunteers for service proceeded very slowly in Cleveland, compared to other Ohio cities. A recruiting station and "...
Want to know more?If you want to know more about this cutting edge product, or schedule a demonstration on your own organisation, please feel free to contact us or read the available documentation at http://www.keep.pt/produtos/retrievo/?lang=en