Database

Creator

Date

Thumbnail

Search results

17,579 records were found.

PAROCHIAL EDUCATION (CATHOLIC). When the Diocese of Cleveland was formed in 1847, no parochial school existed in Cleveland. Bp. LOUIS AMADEUS RAPPE, first bishop of Cleveland, established 16 parishes and parish schools. On Christmas Day, 1849, the first cathedral opened, and a Free School for Boys, and a year later a Free School for Girls, were begun. The influence of parochial schools, for education and the preservation of the Catholic faith, cannot be overemphasized. The tone of public schools was often hostile to Catholicism, and Catholic children were sometimes ridiculed because of their religion. Public school teachers were almost invariably Protestant; in 1857 the State Teachers Assn. urged daily use of the Bible in classrooms. Therefore the Catholic church erected schools in which children would be taught in a nonthreatening atm...
PRENTISS FOUNDATION. See ELISABETH SEVERANCE PRENTISS FOUNDATION.
PHILANTHROPY. Philanthropy in Cleveland sprang from a strong basis in RELIGION. In the 20th century much (though by no means all) philanthropic activity has been devoted to building great nonprofit institutions run by professionals, not only in MEDICINE and social work but also in education and the fine arts; in keeping with the principle that philanthropy should help people help themselves, these institutions draw most of their income from payments (by individuals and by governments) for the services they offer. But 19th century philanthropy was almost always domestic in scale, and, with its strong emphasis on the views and members of particular religious denominations, was often as inward-looking as the work of a mutual-benefit society. Early Cleveland's first relief agency, the WESTERN SEAMEN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, was organized in 1830 ...
WAR OF 1812. When Congress declared war against Great Britain on 18 June 1812, the village of Cleveland consisted of 100 or fewer souls huddled near the mouth of the CUYAHOGA RIVER. Except for their geographic location, they had no reason to be either especially interested or principal actors in the war. However, situated on a significant Lake Erie harbor and attuned to American ideas of possible acquisition of British lands on the lake's northern shore, the villagers were affected in significant ways by the War of 1812. Cleveland served as a base for supplies, a rendezvous for military units, and the location of a military fort and hospital. The war also provoked alarms and invasion scares, which were quieted only with Perry's naval victory on Lake Erie and the subsequent demolition of a British and Indian force by Gen. Wm. Henry Harr...
NURSING. The story of the advancement of nursing in Cleveland is one of multiple challenges, as nurses have sought to improve nursing practice through upgrading standards for nursing education. Cleveland's nursing community has been in the forefront at the state, national, and international levels, providing the vision for many innovations in nursing practice, education, and research and in PUBLIC HEALTH. During the first 7 decades of Cleveland's development, ill people were cared for at home by their families or untrained nurses who also functioned as maids. The few existing hospitals (see HOSPITALS AND HEALTH PLANNING) were primarily for the poor and homeless or for Civil War casualties. The public believed hospitals were places to die. Untrained men and women, with little or no general education, were employed to care for the sick. ...
BOATING (RECREATIONAL). Recreational boating, more specifically yachting, became an organized sport in Cleveland in 1878 when GEO. GARDNER founded the Cleveland Yachting Assn., subsequently known as the CLEVELAND YACHT CLUB. Gardner, later elected mayor of Cleveland, is often referred to as the "Father of Yachting"' in Cleveland. In the summer of 1884, Gardner and other members of the Cleveland Yacht Club, at the invitation of Henry Gerlach, sailed to Put-in-Bay aboard Gerlach's sloop, Lulu. There were other yacht clubs on Lake Erie, and it was Gardner's idea that Put-in-Bay would be a perfect site for a major regatta involving the other clubs on the lake. On 17 Jan. 1885, he called a meeting in Cleveland to form an association of clubs, and from this meeting the Inter-Lake Yachting Assn. was born. The purpose of I-LYA was to foster ca...
BRIDGES. Cleveland, split firmly though unequally by the CUYAHOGA RIVER, is deeply dependent on bridges. The city's east and west sides are joined today by both high fixed spans and lower-level opening bridges. Trains cannot climb steep grades, and their frequency of crossing is low enough to permit the use of opening spans of various sorts. Auto and truck traffic, however, is of such high density that delays occasioned by spans opening for river traffic would be intolerable. Autos and trucks are capable of climbing the relatively steep approaches to high-level bridges over the Cuyahoga River, and today the bridges carrying heavy traffic loads (the Innerbelt Bridge, the HOPE MEMORIAL BRIDGE, the VETERANS MEMORIAL BRIDGE, and the MAIN AVE. BRIDGE) are high fixed spans. There are more than 330 bridges in the immediate Cleveland area, inc...
Want to know more?If you want to know more about this cutting edge product, or schedule a demonstration on your own organisation, please feel free to contact us or read the available documentation at http://www.keep.pt/produtos/retrievo/?lang=en